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First year back home 2009-our story

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I edged closer to the tiny parking spot that stood above Frat row. It was a cement slab just big enough to accomodate a large vehicle but still unnerved me each time I navigated onto the platform.  Plastic bags were grabbed in batches and hauled over the rugged path and into the door of the old brick building. It was grocery day and that meant unloading and preparing a “fast food” meal including plenty of variety for those with dietary restrictions. I stuffed bags inside of each other forming a large ball of sacks that would be used for trash bags at a later time. Several packs of ground beef were placed into a large skillet and stirred, smashing them into smaller bits. The familiar sound of sizzling and the smell of taco meat would soon bring girls into the kitchen. Soos, Heme and Deeja made themselves busy with coloring books and crayons, cards and stickers. They placed themselves at a wooden table just outside the kitchen where residents would soon sit after dishing up their last meal for the day. Sullen faces stared blankly at my workstation and I knew that our discussion regarding school had still left them confused and fearful.

That day we had walked through the rickety wooden gate and into the school yard that lead to a side door. I kissed each one goodbye and delivered them to their respective classrooms, leaving my youngest for last. We had been to see the teacher days before and although she was inexperienced, she was also bubbly, kind and understanding. I was sure that everything would go as planned and so I walked with an air of confidence and pride.  We reached a brightly colored door that said Welcome to first grade. Other students sat at standard desks and tables, hanging hoodies and jackets on a coat rack, backpacks were shoved into cubbies and parents waved their goodbyes. The teacher nodded her head as if to tell me that it would be fine and it was time to leave. I gave a quick wave and returned the same way I had entered, leaving the wooden gate and parking lot behind.

From the upstairs window I scanned the school playground hoping to catch a glimpse of at least one of my four children. The recess bell rang and with it a massive exit from the side door of the one story school. Children carried balls and toys and quickly started in with their mid day break from books and lessons. A tiny figure stood alone in the large grass area, a hood tightly wrapped around the shiny hair of what appeared to be a small child. A stark contrast became unsettling as he crouched near the brightly colored playground equipment looking from side to side and finally giving in to tears. Classmates ran, laughing and giving chase, engaging in childish games that only youngsters play. Their smiles and shrieks of glee only heightened as activities progressed into throwing, catching and eventually climbing onto a metal structure. I watched him cover his face, firmly placing it into the school yard grass until a familiar figure with dark brown hair placed herself next to him and gave him the company he longed for.

53 Comments Post a comment
  1. Oh my gosh, that’s heartbreaking! I’m so glad it had a happy ending though. xx

    Liked by 1 person

    November 16, 2018
  2. was that a sister, Lynn? Not all kids are ready for school.
    Leslie

    Liked by 1 person

    November 16, 2018
  3. Having siblings is a wonderful thing…

    Liked by 1 person

    November 16, 2018
  4. Siblings can be just what’s needed sometimes. I love your writing, Lynn. You have the ability to paint such vivid pictures. I hope your book is going well! Happy Thanksgiving!

    Like

    November 16, 2018
  5. Nice post Lunz. Just goes to show that you have brought up your children well.

    Liked by 1 person

    November 16, 2018
  6. That’s what big sisters are for!

    Liked by 1 person

    November 16, 2018
  7. It is hard to see the little ones so unhappy and uncomfortable and then again it is touching and comforting to see how they are there for each other. Your family has had such a strong connection.

    Liked by 1 person

    November 16, 2018
  8. Such huge adjustments for ones so young. And so hard for a parent to watch. Thanks goodness for siblings.

    Liked by 1 person

    November 16, 2018
  9. Siblings. The one thing between us and the world when we are at school.

    Liked by 1 person

    November 16, 2018
  10. Thank goodness his sister was close. I was also lucky to have big sisters in grade above me. I am pretty sure they didn’t think so at times, LOL lovely story, I remember leaving my son at school for the first time, it was extremely hard to leave. He did fine of course, it was me who was a basket case. My daughter wanted to take the city bus to her first day of school, all by herself, she has always had no fear of the unknown. I don’t think I could of followed the rules of a different county. You amaze me sister. XXXkat

    Liked by 1 person

    November 16, 2018
  11. You certainly captured the anxiety of the first day – of anything, for everybody.

    Liked by 1 person

    November 16, 2018
  12. What a transition. I’m sure it was daunting. Children are so resilient. Just look at your beautiful growing family now! 😊❤️😊

    Liked by 1 person

    November 16, 2018
  13. Lynn, your post is so poignant and expresses so well the emotions of the youngest children. It is painful but beautiful to see the support given by big sister and your hovering presence. xo

    Liked by 1 person

    November 16, 2018
  14. Gosh! That must have been hard

    Liked by 1 person

    November 17, 2018
  15. What a sweet daughter you raised!

    Liked by 1 person

    November 17, 2018
  16. Poor thing going through difficult adjustments so young. Siblings can be a real blessing.

    Liked by 1 person

    November 17, 2018
  17. Bless his heart! First few days of first grade is very frightening! Thank goodness for his sister! xoxoxo Wonderful writing, Lynn!

    Liked by 1 person

    November 17, 2018
  18. A sweet story to heal a frightened child. Lynn, you are truly gifted at motherhood. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    November 17, 2018

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