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First year-2009

DSC05486Several of my friends as well as acquaintances in Riyadh had departed without their children in tow, returning to various locations around the globe. While the choice to leave appeared to be voluntary none of us knew the circumstances that had lead to their decision. Marriages that had fallen apart, abuse and the inability to legally remove youngsters from the country resulted in little ones who were left behind. Memories of dear friends separated from their toddlers as well as teenagers were still fresh in my mind and so the tiny window that gave a view from the walkway into our apartment had been spray painted and covered by a piece of printer paper. Although we had made it back home, the idea of losing my children kept anxiety out of control for years to come.

Summer faded into Fall and a routine that was oddly familiar took shape. The tiny townhouse had come together with furniture that had been procured from the Union Gospel mission as well as odds and ends from mom and dad’s wood house. An alarm buzzed and prodded until we climbed out of bed and readied ourselves for the first day of school. There were no more long trips with a driver and the past few years of homeschooling had been exchanged for a public school that could be seen from the upstairs apartment window. We were together and no one had been left behind in Saudi, making it seem as if somehow all would be well.

Documents and papers were shuffled and stacked until everything was finally in order. A quick trip to the school meant walking out of the apartment door, into the parking lot and through a rickety wooden fence. Vaccination records were not available and birth certificates had taken weeks to arrive, being classified as a Birth abroad report from the consulate. I had met with the principal, teachers and office personnel but still felt that this was somehow wrong and I was at the center of upheaval and a leap into uncertainty. Mother reminded me that it was for the better good and school was part of a new freedom.

48 Comments Post a comment
  1. Such an adjustment! Wow, the start of your freedom Lynn. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    November 9, 2018
  2. A long journey home. You and your children have come so far! Have you been approached by any publishers? Your journey is very interesting and inspiring.

    Liked by 1 person

    November 9, 2018
    • I have not and have been slow on my book. It is all there just organizing it.

      Like

      November 9, 2018
      • Have you kept in touch with any of the parents who had to leave children behind? So sad.

        Liked by 1 person

        November 9, 2018
        • Yes one is a very good friend I knew before I moved to Saudi! We are still friends. Her son turned 18 a few years back and now lives with her. Her other son came this year but two daughters still there! The one was 5 when she left. It broke us up it was devastating!

          Liked by 1 person

          November 9, 2018
          • There is another book in that. Perhaps a magazine would be interested in your initial effort to gather material about your story and other’s stories. I feel this is a very relevant time for these stories to be presented: perhaps also as a word of caution for those who marry, have children and move to countries with different cultural and policy laws.

            Liked by 3 people

            November 9, 2018
          • yes very true! Thanks for the encouragement!

            Liked by 1 person

            November 9, 2018
  3. Wow, Lynn! The beginning of your freedom! Such courage, remarkable! 📚🎶 Christine

    Liked by 1 person

    November 9, 2018
  4. That took a lot of courage Lynn. I still wonder about my old school friend. I fear it might have ended badly for her.
    Leslie

    Liked by 1 person

    November 9, 2018
  5. Out of the fire but still in the pot, Lynn. But you persevered and you did it. Every beautiful picture of your smiling family is a tribute to your love and courage. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    November 9, 2018
  6. Another interesting glimpse along your difficult journey Lynn. So pleased that it turned out so very well. 😍

    Liked by 1 person

    November 9, 2018
  7. You know how lucky you were to leave and take the children with you. A remarkable feat.

    Liked by 1 person

    November 9, 2018
  8. Such a difficult journey you and your children have made. To a life with the freedom to choose their future. You have given them much Lyn.

    Liked by 1 person

    November 9, 2018
  9. Lynn, you and your children are modern day miracles. You had people praying for you and were able to have all your children with you. You had supernatural protection to leave. Even though the transition was difficult, you are all living testimonies. It is no wonder that all of you are so supportive of each other. Your story is remarkable and you do so well in its telling. xoxo

    Liked by 1 person

    November 9, 2018
  10. So you were definitely not alone – and you got your children out despite the obstacles. Well done

    Liked by 1 person

    November 10, 2018
  11. I bet you felt the weight of the world off your shoulders as you gained your freedom. Have you tried approaching a T.V network to combine your stories with a cooking show? Hasn’t been done and maybe a new adventure for you to explore. Cooking middle eastern food with a narration of your life. You need to write a proposal of what the TV show would be like. The worst they can say is no. What have you got to lose.

    Liked by 1 person

    November 10, 2018
  12. You are amazing, Lynn! Getting yourself and your children back to freedom took a lot of courage and perseverance.

    Like

    November 10, 2018
  13. So very sad, the parents that had to leave their children behind! I’m so thankful you were able to get out with all your children!!! xoxoxoxo

    Liked by 1 person

    November 10, 2018
    • Yes so thankful, he threatened to take my youngest one back to Saudi so I always worried and even went into the school asking that they never release him to anyone but me. They told me that he is the father and they would release him!

      Like

      November 10, 2018
  14. I can’t imagine how frightening it was removing all of your children and coming back to the US to begin another unknown future. Your powerful determination got you and your children through safely to the happy days you now share as a family. Amazing story. And you tell it well.

    Liked by 1 person

    November 10, 2018
  15. A painful/happy remembrance and an inspiring story. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    November 10, 2018
  16. Such an inspiring story Lynz. I am so glad you are all together and much happier now.

    Liked by 1 person

    November 10, 2018
  17. Lynn you come so far from those days. My heart aches for the pain that you endured just returning home to the states, But you can close your eyes and open them to the wonderful life you have now! The one you were meant to have. XXkat

    Liked by 1 person

    November 11, 2018
  18. That sounds like a scary but hopeful time.

    Liked by 1 person

    November 13, 2018

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