Hummus (garbanzo beans) with spices

Quick tidbit– When I refer to hummus in this post, I am speaking of garbanzo beans or chick peas which in Arabic are called–hummus.

When we walked through the Medan in Damascus, (shopping near in laws) the streets were alive with the sights and sounds of the Middle East. It was actually more like something out of a movie but true to life. Spices, falafal, fresh lamb hanging outside of shops, Busa (ice cream) and fried Shawarma sandwiches. Men stood outside of their shops watching the t.v. above them, engrossed in the latest soap opera that was trending around Syria. One very simple food that would not make the list of exciting and interesting, is this garbanzo bean treat. In years past beans were cooked, salted, seasoned and scooped up for a few coins. My son, Abdullah remembered this when I made dry garbanzo beans for Falafal. He asked if he could take some and immediately added the spices he had remembered when visiting Taita’s (Grama) house.

Note

When I made this dish I used dry garbanzo beans, soaked them and boiled them, you can use canned beans as well. I will not explain soaking or cooking in this post but I am adding the option of using dry beans for those who are accustomed to preparing them.

Directions and ingredients

1 can garbanzo beans, drained

1 Tbs. fresh parsley minced

2 cloves garlic minced or pressed

1 Tbs. lemon juice or to taste

1/4 tsp. cumin

1 tbs. olive oil

salt to taste

I usually use warm beans from my large pot of cooked beans that I make for other recipes, so you can heat your beans if you prefer them warm. Β Heat beans, add the lemon juice, salt, cumin, garlic, parsley and gently mix, add olive oil and stir. These measurements are purely based on taste. You might add more or less salt, lemon juice, cumin and garlic.

This simple treat is delightful and in our family eaten as is, or with Arabic bread.

Pictures of visit to Syria 2008

 

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151 thoughts on “Hummus (garbanzo beans) with spices

    1. haha well I messed up and put the name hummus which is the name for the bean in arabic. I only speak kitchen arabic and so things I learned to cook over there I use their name. In arabic many dishes just hold the name. Such as a green bean stew, called simply green beans! haha

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  1. Homemade hummus is 100% better than the stuff you can buy in the stores!! I had never made my own until I met my husband and he introduced me to making it. I’ll have to compare your recipe with his! I love the picture, makes me want to reach across the screen and grab a bite πŸ™‚

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      1. Oh, how cool! Okay, now I know. πŸ™‚ I just assumed it was a different way of making the “hummus” that I know, since the spices are mostly the same. I’m still going to try it!

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      2. I don’t speak arabic well at all, but let’s say kitchen Arabic, haha so I still think of words in that way especially things I never used before cooking middle eastern food haha. thanks so much for stopping by!

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      3. Yeah, that makes sense to me, I am the same with the things I learned when I was living in Holland and first learned in Dutch. Kind of funny, though! πŸ™‚

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  2. Me on a plate! Delicious. I have such an obsession with chickpeas that my second daughter was nicknamed Chickapea and had a song ‘composed’ which we all used to belt out to calm her as a baby. No wonder she upped and moved to Malaysia at the first opportunity πŸ˜‰

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  3. Hello. I’ve just stumbled across your blog from your comment on Elaine’s at Foodbod πŸ™‚ What a lovely looking plate of hummus (just asked my hubby who speaks Arabic who confirmed that both chickpeas & houmous are called hummus- I can’t believe I never knew that so thank you!) I love all your photos too… reminds me of so many places in the Middle East πŸ™‚

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    1. I felt silly posting it but forgot oops, the things I learned while cooking authentic middle eastern food, I then call by that name. There is a dish, fussilia, which is a stew but it is called fussulia-green beans haha just the way it is! Ask you hubby haha thanks for coming by!

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  4. Lynz, though I am glad you are not in that horrible environment (with the person) do you ever miss the culture or atmosphere of these places? I am so impressed with your absorbing the beautiful parts of it, including the foods.

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    1. I do miss some parts! I got married at age 20 so spent most of my life in the middle eastern culture! Then moved to Saudi, visited in- laws in Syria! they were important people in my life, I loved them! So, I feel we were forced out of our home by his extreme behavior which is what he did to his next wife. She was also forced to leave and live in a day care with no money from him! She had a small child. I miss holidays like Ramadan, I miss the lights they put on the palm trees, not having to worry about bills, broken down car, etc. But i am free to at least think and walk and drink a cup of coffee. I also had 5 kids in Saudi and met so many amazing people. so, I miss those times in ways. thanks for asking Colleen!! xx

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  5. We love Hummus! I currently have 3 flavors in the fridge. None homemade! I’ve never tried making it before.

    When you make it from dried beans do you use the stock pot method or a pressure cooker to cook the beans?
    Seriously, I’d probably start with canned beans before trying it from dried beans though!

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    1. I have a recipe for regular hummus and trust me it is super simple! I posted it a long time ago, it’s under middle eastern recipes, appetizers. You can add different flavors if you like, mine is the standard type sold in the middle east. I use a can for that simple recipe unless I am making the beans for other stuff as well. I soak the beans and then cook them. I know there are other methods for soaking them faster etc. But yes maybe a can for now and then progress? Trust me you will think it’s so easy!

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    1. Can you believe I had never really eaten garbanzo beans, eggplant, cilantro etc. these are all things used so much in middle eastern cooking and for my kids just everyday ingredients among many other interesting ingredients! Thanks Jean!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Great share! It’s been so long since I made hummus, I usually just pick up a tub from the supermarket these days, but your recipe reminded me of how simple and delicious it is to do it yourself!

    Also lovely pics!

    Liked by 1 person

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