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Hotel, park and business-Riyadh

Saudi20 (36)

some type of office building

Saudi20 (37)

Popular park in the background

S5002855

G & G2 (30)

mom and dad at the mall on a visit

55 Comments Post a comment
  1. Interesting pictures Lynn:)

    Liked by 1 person

    November 3, 2015
  2. The office and malls are fancy! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    November 3, 2015
    • oh my they are beyond fancy. When we came for a visit, my hometown had a beautiful new mall and the kids thought it was very boring and plain and were surprised!

      Liked by 1 person

      November 3, 2015
  3. I notice your mom is not wearing a head covering…is it common for foreigners not to wear them there? It just seems there’s strict rules about that kinda stuff there.

    Liked by 1 person

    November 3, 2015
    • In riyadh you must wear an abaya but not cover your hair, but in a little village you would want to. In khobar where we lived for a year, it is very western ladies wear long sleeves and a longer shirt!

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      November 3, 2015
    • Riyadh is super conservative where jeddah and khobar are not

      Liked by 1 person

      November 3, 2015
      • Totally makes sense!!

        Liked by 1 person

        November 3, 2015
        • I hope so! I know it is a different world ha ha

          Liked by 1 person

          November 3, 2015
          • Like night and day almost lol

            Liked by 1 person

            November 3, 2015
          • yes so different, some people move there and get lots of benefits and hate it and make trouble while all around them there are those in poverty and horrible situations,so my feeling is, be respectful and learn about a different place, why not.once in a life time thing

            Liked by 1 person

            November 3, 2015
          • Absolutely Lynz! Great perspective!

            Liked by 1 person

            November 3, 2015
          • well you are there so why not, for American, British expats, usually very luxurious living!

            Liked by 1 person

            November 3, 2015
  4. Lynn, did those trees in that mall appear to be real? Just curious…we’re not talking a couple of potted plants here!

    Liked by 1 person

    November 3, 2015
  5. Loved the one of your parentsโค๏ธ as always I love seeing other places! ๐Ÿ’•

    Liked by 1 person

    November 3, 2015
  6. Lynn, this is so interesting. I see your mom is wearing an abaya, and your dad more casually dressed but with long pants, is this quite acceptable when visiting?

    Liked by 1 person

    November 3, 2015
    • oh yes. It is still very conservative in Riyadh but not so much in other areas. Men can wear whatever they want, not shorts or anything offensive like with bad words or let’s say a shirt with a dirty type picture or alcohol advertisement etc.Some ladies in Khobar wore long shirts long sleeves no abaya!

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      November 3, 2015
      • Fascinating. It must have been quite an experience for your mom and dad when they came to visit.

        Liked by 1 person

        November 3, 2015
        • yes at first it was, then they were used to it, bargaining at the souk, talking to taxi drivers giving directions. People welcomed them with open arms, insisted they go first in line, asked to help them. In the middle east older people have high respect. they love many foods and had fun going to the malls, fancy shops from Europe etc.

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          November 4, 2015
  7. That park looks very nice. Was it hard for your mom to be there without being covered? I’ve heard that foreigners can be treated pretty harsh without the proper covering.

    Liked by 1 person

    November 3, 2015
    • She never had any issues and westerners do not cover their hair that I have ever seen. In Riyadh it is more conservative but in jeddah and Khobar much more western. Ladies wear an abaya or even long sleeves and long shirts as well in Khobar. Saudis love talking to and getting to know Americans!!

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      November 3, 2015
      • That surprises me. I had no idea. I always thought that if we had moved there, as we had planned so many years ago, that I would have to be covered.

        Liked by 1 person

        November 3, 2015
        • ok in Riyadh you would wear an abaya, if you went to a super old area, or village then maybe a little scarf. The main thing is not standing out, not trying to look out of place. I have never met anyone who had trouble but I am sure some do! I was never talked to ever, but a lady who was muslim told me they stopped her because she had on lots of make up and bright lipstick. So basically you just have to be careful!

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          November 3, 2015
  8. Different!

    Liked by 1 person

    November 3, 2015
  9. Great pictures, thanks for sharing. Have a happy day! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    November 3, 2015
  10. Kev #

    The mall looks pretty nice!

    Liked by 1 person

    November 3, 2015
  11. Great photos Lynn ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

    November 3, 2015
  12. I enjoyed your photos and also reading the comments/questions from other bloggers ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    November 3, 2015
  13. It looks so opulent inside

    Liked by 1 person

    November 3, 2015
  14. looks good ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    November 3, 2015
  15. I have a question Lynn – may sound lame but wanted to always ask someone from middle east – any lady (irrespective of the religion) should wear a burka while out of house?

    Liked by 1 person

    November 4, 2015
    • OK not talking religion, it depends where you live. Of course as far as religion, yes. but each place is different, in Syria everyone dresses how they want. Some wear long shirts, some wear a long coat, some wear western type clothes. Syrian women usually wear a coat like a coat you might wear in a different country, called a jelbab any color. In saudi must wear the abaya. Each place is different but Saudi is way more strict Saudi ladies cover their faces as well. In syria or jordan you dont see that as much. Hope this helped feel free to ask anything!

      Liked by 1 person

      November 4, 2015
  16. How did your mum feel about changing her dress so drastically, it must have hit home to her, that although she had to do this for a week or so, but for her daughter, this was now the norm.
    Interesting comment about the lady wearing heavy makeup. It fascinates me here that girls cover themselves from head to toe, then don false eyelashes, khol and ruby red lips giving the total opposite effect to ‘modesty’ I see the Hijab as a form of protest or political statement in a none muslim country, particularly when worn as this – I often feel like asking ‘why do you have all that on your face if you are trying to be modest’?

    Liked by 1 person

    November 4, 2015
    • She has been there I think 23 times! So she is totally used to it! Yes interesting comments and insights! Yes hijab literally (or I was taught) it means a barrier, making a wall between you and men, so being modest and that means your speech, hijab doesnt mean a scarf, your actions etc. So, everything that goes with it, a package of your manners etc. you are very wise! thanks for the insightful comment!

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      November 4, 2015
      • Maybe I am more exposed to this than people in the States (giving me more insight) I find some (not all, as as you so rightly pointed out, you cannot generalise) hypocritical because of this conflict of observance, and to be honest, in some instances quite aggressive, it is as if they are wearing a ‘badge’ and making a statement. I also know many girls, who do observe the true significance. and are lovely sincere people.

        Liked by 1 person

        November 4, 2015
        • yes so true! you do have a unique insight! allot of times things are cultural not even from religion!

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          November 4, 2015
  17. Everything beautiful. ^_^

    Liked by 1 person

    November 4, 2015
  18. The photo of your parents is lovely and the mall looks very bright and airy, especially with the trees in there. They also look very upmarket.

    Liked by 1 person

    November 4, 2015

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