41 thoughts on “Riyadh– camels, malls and desert

  1. hello…great pictures….Ok I went to the acupuncturist and he does treat people who have active macular and it helps slow down the progress so it is worth looking into, but you will need to find a acupuncturist that treats so check some out…also he sent me a link for the best eye vitamin that he feels are the best, mahttp://www.exirsaffron.com/Vision-Max-for-AMDcular and 1 gram of fish oil per day and I just copied the entire email for you…its got great information…hope I didn’t over whelm you…kat

    Here’s how to use a wide variety of brightly colored vegetables to keep your vision healthy. Macular degeneration—a leading cause of blindness—is preventable.

    Helping prevent macular degeneration (MD) is as near at hand as corn and collards. Lutein and zeaxanthin (ze.a.xan.thin), the two carotenoid pigments that color yellow and green produce, are the responsible antioxidants. When you eat ample colorful veggies and fruit, you protect your eye sight.

    Of course, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle supports healthy vision. But lutein and zeaxanthin appear to be the most potent nutrients to prevent MD. This degenerative eye disease is the leading cause of legal blindness in people over the age of 55.

    That’s why people are advised to eat more produce. What to do, however, if you cherish your vision but don’t like collards and tire of corn? The good news is there are dozens of antioxidant-rich vegetables and fruits.

    So do your eyes a favor and the next time you’re at the market, go for color. Look afresh at the produce section and bring home something orange and a couple of leafy strangers. Should your market have only a paltry selection of bright veggies, find a better market.

    Let’s look at the sources for both lutein and zeaxanthin. The latter is highest in yellow corn, yellow and orange peppers, winter squash, carrots, yams, cantaloupe, peaches, grapes, oranges, mangos and nectarines. My rule of thumb is to daily enjoy a serving of a yellow vegetable and, in season, a yellow fruit.

    Because lutein is most abundant in greens, here’s a map for identifying—and using—the lutein rich greens. Aim for a minimum of three green servings daily.

    The darker the green, the higher the lutein. So which veggie part is the green gold-mine? It’s the leaf. Curiously enough only four botanical families provide over 95% of the leafy greens in our markets.

    Because the vegetables in each group share culinary properties all you need to know is how to use one from each family and then you can freely substitute others. This expands your green repertoire exponentially.

    And, here’s the good news. You can already fix lettuce, spinach, parsley and broccoli and they each represent one of the four leafy groups.

    Four Types of Leafy Greens
    1. Lettuce Family Have you met lettuce’s relations? Dandelions, endive, frissee and the various types of chicory are all great in salads. If they’re exceptionally bitter, add them sparingly to a salad or parboil and serve them like spinach. Braising, which means simply to sauté until wilted, also works for lettuce and its clan.

    2. Spinach Family The next vegetable group high in lutein includes spinach and relatives. When tender, spinach and beet greens are tasty in salad. They, along with chard and the lesser known relatives amaranth and orach, are also used as potherbs (boiled in water), added to soups and casseroles or sautéed. Unlike spinach, it’s useful to separate chard leaves from their stems and to prepare leaves and stems as two separate vegetables.

    3. Parsley & Relatives Third is parsley and its cousins—celery, cilantro, dill and fennel. Remember that a parsley garnish and celery leaves are edible and munch on them accordingly. I lavish parsley and other green herbs in soup, omelets and just about everything but dessert.

    4. Cabbage Family Last we have the cabbage family. In terms of dark leaves and versatility, this clan which includes broccoli, reigns supreme. So, if your soup, stir-fry or casserole calls for broccoli, try substituting it with one of its hardy relatives such as bok choy, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, collards, mustard greens or kale.

    The more delicate greens of the cabbage family, arugula, Chinese cabbage, mizuna and watercress, are excellent in a salad or lightly cooked dishes. If any of these veggies is a foreigner to your kitchen you and don’t know if it’s hardy or delicate…nibble a leaf and you’ll know. The more tender and/or delicately-flavored greens require little or no cooking; whereas, the more bitter, pungent and/or tough greens require more cooking. Sautéing moderates the strong flavor of mustards and kale.

    Also, lutein is in more than just vegetable leaves. Some edible stalks contain it, like asparagus, celery and fennel. It’s in some edible flowers like broccoli and artichokes. Lutein is found in vegetable fruits like peas, green beans and avocados; it colors some edible skins, like cucumbers, zucchini and acorn squash. So don’t peel cucumbers and when the squash skin is toothsome, bon appetit.

    Macular Degeneration Diet
    A macular degeneration diet will include foods high in antioxidants and foods high in omega 3.

    This diet will require some changes in your eating habits – but it will be worth it. Start by making a small change in just one area.

    Perhaps it will be to substitute brown rice for white rice or slow cooked oatmeal instead of cold cereal. According to Lylas G. Mogk, M. D. director of the Visual Rehabilitation and Research Center of Michigan,

    “Even if you already have macular degeneration , you may be able to slow its progress by the choices you make in the grocery store.”

    Ocular Nutrition
    Never underestimate the power of good nutrition to give our bodies what it needs to heal and repair itself. The good news is that there is an increasing awareness of the importance of eating fresh fruits and vegetables, low glycemic carbohydrates, and foods high in omega 3.

    There is plenty of research to support ocular nutrition for healthy vision.

    Dr. Michael Samuel, a macular degeneration specialist, writes in his book, Macular Degeneration: A Complete Guide for Patients and Their Families,

    “Early dry AMD can be prevented, slowed or even reversed with diet and lifestyle changes.”

    Low Glycemic Carbs
    Allen Taylor, PhD, director of the Laboratory for Nutrition and Vision Research at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA) at Tufts University, examined the eyes of more than 500 women between 53 and 73 years of age.

    Taylor, who is also a nutrition, ophthalmology and biochemistry professor on the Tufts health sciences campus in Boston stated

    “The likelihood of having abnormalities characteristic of AMD on eye exam more than doubled for women who consumed diets with the highest glycemic index, regardless of other factors already known or suspected to increase the risk of AMD, such as age, high blood pressure, cigarette smoking, and obesity.”

    In other words the type of carbohydrate that we eat does matter in a macular degeneration diet. If glycemic index is a new word or concept for you I suggest that you read Sugar Busters! Quick & Easy Cookbook. You may also go to http://www.glycemicindex.com for a complete listing.

    In a nutshell, foods that cause our blood sugar to spike which then results in an increase secretion of insulin, are harmful to our health and to our vision.

    To get a list of low glycemic carbs that are good for you click here: Low Glycemic Carbs

    Foods High in Omega 3
    hanks to the low fat craze there is a lot of misinformed people – I was one of them. My thought was there is no such thing as a good fat.

    However, it is important to know two things when it comes to

    eating the right fats for a macular degeneration diet.

    √ What fats are healthy and good for you and

    √ What is the right ratio

    Most of you know that we need to avoid trans fats.

    But did you know that according to a 2001 Harvard study, that people whose diets had the right ratio (3:1) of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids had less macular degeneration than those whose diets were out of balance?

    It is very important to include oily fish in your macular degeneration diet to get more omega-3s.

    To read more about omega-3 benefits click here: Omega 3 Benefits

    What this means for you is that we get much more omega-6 fatty acids in our diet and very little omega-3 fatty acids.

    Yet omega-3 provides critical protection to our retinas. So, how does one get the right ratio of fats in a macular degeneration diet? Foods High in Omega 3

    Protein
    Many essential vitamins and minerals are found in meat and nuts, like vitamin B6, B12 and zinc. Meat that is high in fat of course is damaging to our health.

    Foods to Avoid are:

    √ Roasted and Salted nuts

    √ Limit Red Meat to less than 3 times per month – and eat only lean cuts

    √ Fried chicken

    Foods to Include are:

    √ Eggs

    √ Unroasted Almonds

    √ Wheat Germ

    √ Chicken

    √ Turkey

    √ Unroasted Brazil Nuts

    √ Cold water fish such as salmon, cod, or haddock

    If you are just beginning with a macular degeneration diet, the best way to start is by making changes slowly. Make a decision in one area and stick to it for a couple of weeks and then make another change. Choose to incorporate foods that are most appealing and get rid of the foods in your cupboard that are harmful and tempting.

    Anti-Inflammatory Diet
    Did you know that inflammation plays a key role in the development of macular degeneration? Dr. James C. Folk, author of Protect Your Sight, writes, “Other studies also support that macular degeneration is associated with over active inflammation… The Age Related Eye Disease Study found than an elevation of C-reactive protein in the blood was associated with advanced AMD. C-reactive protein is a marker of inflammation in the body.”

    Find out what causes this inflammation, how it affects our eyes and if anything be done to influence or diminish chronic inflammation in our bodies: Anti-Inflammatory Diet

    Antioxidant Rich Foods
    Antioxidant rich foods provide protection from free radical damage. Free radicals damage our bodies at the cellular level.

    Antioxidants help keep our bodies in oxidative balance so there is less damage to the cell membrane and the DNA. Free radical damage is a key player in aging and in many degenerative diseases like macular degeneration.

    The benefits of antioxidant rich foods are many. Find out how the macula especially benefits from these types of foods: Antioxidant Rich Foods

    Kale Nutrients
    Dark leafy greens like kale are essential to a macular degeneration diet. Perhaps you are like me, and never had any of these dark leafy greens in your diet growing up.

    Just about every book on macular degeneration writes about the benefits of eating kale, mustard greens and collards. I just couldn’t ignore the voices of ophthalmologists and nutritionists so I soon began sauteing it, adding it to soups and juicing the leaves.

    Lower your risk of developing AMD by including these foods that are rich in lutein and zeaxanthin. kale nutrients

    Vitamins for Macular Degeneration
    Due to many factors, such as the way our food is processed, nutrients depleted from the soil, and harvesting food before they are ripe, much of our food does not contain the vitamins and minerals that they did years ago.

    Although it is preferable to get your vitamins and minerals from a good diet, it may not be possible to get all that we need without supplementing with vitamins for macular degeneration. Click here to read more: Vitamins for Macular Degeneration

    Low Glycemic Carbs
    Low glycemic carbs are key to an anti-inflammatory diet and to a macular degeneration diet.

    Healthy Carbs
    It is important to know what foods are considered healty carbs and which foods are bad carbohydrates. Allen Taylor, PhD, director of the Laboratory for Nutrition and Vision Research at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA) at Tufts University, examined the eyes of more than 500 women between 53 and 73 years of age.

    Taylor, who is also a nutrition, ophthalmology and biochemistry professor on the Tufts health sciences campus in Boston stated

    “The likelihood of having abnormalities characteristic of AMD on eye exam more than doubled for women who consumed diets with the highest glycemic index, regardless of other factors already known or suspected to increase the risk of AMD, such as age, high blood pressure, cigarette smoking, and obesity.”

    In other words the type of carbohydrate that we eat does matter in a macular degeneration diet. If glycemic index is a new word or concept for you I suggest that you read The New Sugar Busters! Cut Sugar to Trim Fat.

    You may also go to http://www.glycemicindex.com for a complete listing.

    In a nutshell, foods that cause our blood sugar to spike which then results in an increase secretion of insulin, are harmful to our health and to our vision.

    Good Carbohydrates
    There are good carbohydrates for you and there are bad carbs that lead to chronic inflammation. It is important to know which ones to include and which ones you need to start eliminating from your diet.

    Low Glycemic Carbs Include:
    √ Whole Wheat Flour – whole wheat bread, rolls, or crackers

    √ Sweet Potatoe

    √ Brown Rice or Wild Rice

    √ Whole Wheat Pasta

    √ Oatmeal – regular, slow cooked

    √ Vegetables – asparagus, red, green and orange peppers, squash, broccoli, cabbage, brussels sprouts,

    √ Beans – chick Peas, black beans, kidney beans, lima beans, butter beans

    √ Fruit – cherries, grapefruit, tomatoes, apricots

    √ Raw nuts

    Generally the foods that are higher in fiber are the low glycemic carbs that are better for you.

    Bad Carbohydrates
    Bad carbohydrates are foods that contribute to chronic inflammation which increases our risk for macular degeneration along with other diseases. These bad carbs are high in the glycemic index.

    Foods to Avoid are:
    √ White Flour – white bread, bagels, cookies, cakes, white rolls

    √ White Potato

    √ White Rice

    √ White Pasta

    √ Instant Oatmeal and Processed Cold Cereals

    √ Rice Cakes

    √ Pretzels

    √ French Fries

    √ Ice Cream

    √ Watermelon

    .

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      1. I am so glad you did! I think my mom has this, she uses drops or something but wow diet is so important. Thanks so much for sharing with me, it is great to know about these things!!!

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      2. ya I am the kind of person who is what it is and keep searching for all I can do, I am already doing most of the list, I don’t eat fish but I will eat albacore tuna and I take the fish pills…I will change my vision caps to the one in the link I sent you with saffron, I may turn orange..LOL..hope it helps your mom

        Liked by 1 person

      3. ha ha !! Kat that would be something!! Thanks I will talk to her, she kind of ignores it but mentions it here and there, so when you said the word I recognized it!! thanks!!!

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